Friday, February 22, 2013

Heritage Auctions

Holy Balls! Selling comic art stuff at a Heritage Auction is the way to go.

$17,250 to DVS; $3373.50 to Heritage

There are some unprecedented prices being paid here. 

Hmmm... someone sitting on a few hundred pages, most of which are arguably better than any of these,  might consider giving Heritage a call... 

naaahhhhhhhhhh...


Cerebus 26 p 10
Price: $1250 ($1493.75 with the Heritage Tax)

Cerebus 29 p 9
Price $800 ($956)

Cerebus 30 p 13
Price $1100 ($1314.50)

Cerebus 32 p 16
Price $850 ($1015.75)
Cerebus 34 p 12
Price $1200 ($1434)

Cerebus 35 p 19
Price $3000 ($3585)
Cerebus 39 p 17
Price $950 ($1135.25)
Cerebus 36 p 1
Price $2800 ($3346)
Cerebus 50 p 1
Price $2600 ($3107)
Cerebus 44 p 1
Price $2700 ($3226.50)

22 comments:

j_ay said...

Prices wayyyy too high, but that's what Heritage has the power to do.
If I ever liquidate my small Original Art Stuffs, I will let them handle it all...

j_ay said...

Doing the usual weekend looking through the Spam folder to see if anything was important thing, I see that Heritage had Dave there in NY...so his Drama Queen King of Comics move of "The Last Signing" a year or so ago was, as we knew it would be, Drama Queen bullshit.

Margaret said...

Those prices are crazy high. And to top it off the fee for Heritage. That is a lot of money to spend - luckily these same people don't seem to bid up the pages on ebay that high. . .

Lorenzo said...

I have to say that the prices do not seem so high to me. With just the possible exceptions of the pages from issues 44 and 50 (but 44 had a certain Zivago feeling, and 50 cannot be defined any less than "iconic") the other prices looks reasonable - at least to me. Cerebus 35 and 36 were totally worth the paid value. Pages from 26 and 30 were a steal. We should not forget that, in the end, we are talking about some of the most beloved material of the whole series. Alchemist, you should accept the fact that you are sitting on a great value with your collection - I am sure it is not enough to scare you!

alchemist57 said...

Hi Lorenzo. I have to say I disagree with you and have the same slack jaw look that j and margaret have. There is no precedent here. Look back at mid-2012, and a set of 6 or so pages sold at Heritage. The highest price, including the Heritage tax, was $3200, and that was for a nice page from issue #1, and plenty of beloved pages from this part of the series, all landing in the $800-1000 (including premium) range. I don't see this as anything other than odd. The $1500 ebay pages (with no premium) have not jumped off the shelf today because of these prices. :)

Greg said...

I hadn't realized that Dave himself consigned these pages until reading the entry and comments here. Now I feel substantially better about having overspent so heavily on the one I bought!

j_ay said...

Greg, not only consigned, but he was there too. Which probably helped the bidding.

Greg said...

It must have been very gratifying for him to see his artwork making so much money in person. That makes me a little happy, to have been a part of that (though once the credit card bills start coming in, I might not feel quite the same about the whole thing!). Either way, I got a piece that was very personally meaningful from my childhood when I first read High Society... so I can live with the price.

j_ay said...

I’d have to imagine it was indeed gratifying for Dave…but we all know he’ll still turn it into some sort of sob story...
Congrats on getting a page though!

D said...

I see I wasn't the only one who thought the prices on these were very high. Congratulations to Dave!

The only one that I saw as a breakthrough page was the splash from #36. I would expect any page from that issue to do well, as it was a classic from end to end.

Everything else I'm completely baffled by.

Lorenzo said...

Hi Brian! I definetely agree that Dave being there, not to mention the pages coming from his very hands, could have inflated the prices a little bit. But I still beieve that the first 100-something issues of Cerebus may have a much wider audience than the later ones, and so I am still not surprised about the prices. I mean, take me: for the page where he leaves Michelle's house (the one with the key falling on the floor), should it ever be auctioned, for that page the sky is the limit I would go. I suppose I am not the only one who have this kind of feelings towards specific pages, and I frankly believe that most of these feelings are concentrated in the earlier stories.

Lorenzo said...

Furthermore, the 1500 USD ebay pages are, most of the time, obviously overpriced. It always depends about the page we are talking about, I guess. Just my two cents, of course.

Kenneth Thomas said...

Very interesting to find this site...I'm the person who bought the #36 splash. Yes, I know I way overpaid for it, but I'm a seller's (and auction house's) dream - someone who is willing to pay over market because of sentimental attachment (and no spouse to stop my recklessness). When I think of Cerebus, the 36 splash is almost always the image that comes to mind first. I actually didn't even know about this auction until the Wednesday before, and I only looked into it because of an idle curiosity about what original Cerebus pages were going for (I collect comics, not original art). My jaw dropped when I saw the 36 splash, and it was pretty much over for me at that point, with Cerebus being my favorite comic and this being my own personal favorite iconic image.

The pre-internet bidding closed at $1600 - my max proxy bid was $1750 and I hoped to get the page for under $2000 (which would have been reasonable for this one, I think). The highest proxy bid was $2600, though, so I had to go next increment up (half bid was unavailable to me, I had already used it). I might've hit it once over $3000, but I wouldn't go higher. I know the bidder's premium is a rip-off, but as long as saps like me will pay it...even worse, I live in Texas and have to pay sales tax.

Unless my life takes an absolute nosedive, I will never, ever sell this. I have a large comic book collection and have never sold an item, so I'm confident about that.

alchemist57 said...

Hi Kenneth - Great to hear from you. I'm with you all the way. I have written a few times about the issues of "value" and "worth" and when it comes to a grail page, market value is not at all the driver. Your story resonates with me completely - if I ever see that page again (which I lost, at least in part, from having been on a plane that was late and could not up my bid) where Cerebus' tail rips through the front of his pants like a big, err, schlong, and those tea-party ladies faint... I will just drop a fortune on it. At the end of the year, when I try to figure out which pages are outlying points because they were probably someone's grail page, I try to assess what was way off from the normal market. There is no accounting for a grail premium - I get it. This happens with iconic 1960s Marvel pages all the time... only with a few more zeroes in the prices!

So... you did not overpay for it, kiddo. You paid exactly what it was worth to you. And a one-way trip into the collection is certainly something I understand. Enjoy your page without worry - you got it, and that's all that matters!

(I'm in Waco this term, pardner, so I'll see if I feel the vibration when the page hits the border!)

j_ay said...

I agree with Brian, Kenneth. None of us are ever discouraging people from paying particular prices on particular things, we just comment usually based on a feel (a feel of ‘I would not pay that price’) and also on the statistics Brian reports every year.

What something is “worth” is almost always subjective. And that’s what makes it interesting.

Congrats on obtaining a piece so important to you.

Greg said...

Yeah, Kenneth - I paid almost as much for the page I bought (the splash from issue 50) as you did for yours, and even I think that from an artistic standpoint, yours is FAR superior to mine. Just like you, though, the DENOUEMENT page really resonates with me for some personal reasons and I felt that I had to have it.

It might be the first original art page I've ever bought where I placed a bid absolutely certain that I'll never be able to break even should I choose to sell, but that's the price I paid for something that gives me happy thoughts of my younger days.

You also don't realize just how lucky you are to stumble upon your grail page without even looking. I've been looking for one Cerebus page for at least 15 years now without even the first peep of it. For all I know, it burned up in a fire in 1992. Still, almost every person who posts a page for sale on eBay gets an e-mail from me asking if they might have it. Someday, maybe all the hunting will work out, and maybe I'll get the chance to grossly overpay for another page... :)

alchemist57 said...

It is not an exhaustive treatment of the topic, but you might enjoy parts of this book: "Grailpages: Original Comic Book Art And The Collectors" by Steven Alan Payne ($16 at amazon), from 2009.

It is the only book I know of that tries to take on the questions surrounding this grail page business.

Plus: I got to contribute one of the brief commentaries.

Greg said...

As if ANYONE can afford to buy that book after this Heritage auction... (in all seriousness, thanks for pointing that out -- I'll have to check it out!)

Greg said...

So now that we've gotten over the insanely high prices from Heritage, anyone care to take a guess on how much the complete issue including Jaka's first appearance will end up selling for (assuming it meets reserve)?

Greg said...

$15,850... seems reasonable.

D said...

The winner of the auction talks a little about it here.

D said...

Err... make that here. Sorry about that.